Goodbye Hillary… See You in 2012

Now that Obama has picked his running mate, my five stage grieving process has reached its conclusion. Acceptance. My optimistic side held on to hope, despite the discouraging reality. In the end, I’m not disappointed that his running mate is Biden. I’m disappointed that it’s not Hillary Clinton running for President. The person more likely to beat McCain. Who knows, maybe I’ll be proven wrong. Maybe Obama will beat McCain. I just think that sometimes hope and reality don’t coexist. In my case, my hope for seeing Hillary Clinton in the White House could not co-exist with the reality of overt sexism and misogyny . As for Obama, the sugarcoated message of hope just doesn’t seem enough to overcome his lack of experience and the Bradley factor. Maybe I’ll be proven wrong. Maybe we will get a democrat in the White House.  I just think that’s a stronger reality in 2012.  Hillary… I’ll see you in the White House in 2012.

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6 thoughts on “Goodbye Hillary… See You in 2012

  1. I am disappointed with the Democratic Party in general.

    This election process has shown me one thing and that is that the Democrats and the media still think less of women. I really feel that “they put Hillary in her place” by demanding she do things no other candidate has had to do in history and expected more from her than the other candidates.

    It’s no wonder that slavery ended long before women’s suffrage !

    I am also angry with Hillary and Bill for cow towing to the PARTY in the end.

    It makes you realize this party is just a machine and of course It’s all about MONEY.

    I will not vote Democratic in this election and may never again in the future.

  2. I completely understand your anger and frustration. I am so disappointed that Hillary is not on the ticket as the Presidential nominee. And I am flabbergasted that the DNC and Howard Dean stood by and said and did NOTHING while Hillary was demonized by the media. Their silence was a sign that sexism and misogyny was perfectly acceptable.

    Both parties are about money. And in the end, in our 2-party flawed political system, it comes down to two candidates neither of which I’m excited about. I will vote for Obama because I believe we’ll be better off with a democrat in the office and because he treated Hillary with respect throughout the campaign process. However, I will NEVER donate any money to DNC. Bill and Hillary did what was good for their political careers, mainly for Hillary’s. And if Obama doesn’t win this election, no one can blame the Clintons. And in 4 years, Hillary will finally have a real chance.

  3. As a Democrat who is absolutely planning to vote for Obama this fall and who fundamentally abhors John McCain, let me be among the first to say that, if John McCain wins this election due in any part to disaffected Clinton supporters, and the 2012 Democratic nominee is Hillary Clinton, not only will I be voting for John McCain (or whomever the GOP nominee is), I will give them every cent I can afford to give and every second of my time that I can spare. You Clinton supporters who are hoping to throw this election to McCain need to be aware that this kind of game is a two-way street.

    Democrats against Clinton Defectors. We are out there, and come 2012 we will be organized.

  4. Actually, I hope Obama wins. I’m a die-hard Clinton supporter, but I will vote for Obama. However, Obama did not do himself any favors by picking Biden for his VP. I like Biden, but he does not add to the ticket. Clinton, on the other hand, would have unified the party and made the ticket stronger. Take a good look at McCain’s campaign since choosing Sarah Palin as VP. His ticket is a lot stronger. I’m not saying that she’s getting the disenfranchised Clinton voters, but she is mobilizing the conservatives. Had Obama picked Clinton as his VP, the ticket would have been stronger, and Sarah Palin’s pick for VP would not have gotten nearly as much attention as it has. In fact, Sarah Palin probably would not have been chosen as VP.

    And your Clinton-hatred is really dumbfounding. I don’t understand how an Obama supporter can vote for a GOP candidate, any more than I understand how a Clinton supporter can vote for a GOP candidate. I find that men who don’t like Clinton try to disguise their sexism by pointing to qualities in her that are acceptable in other male politicians. Get over it!

  5. And your Clinton-hatred is really dumbfounding. I don’t understand how an Obama supporter can vote for a GOP candidate, any more than I understand how a Clinton supporter can vote for a GOP candidate. I find that men who don’t like Clinton try to disguise their sexism by pointing to qualities in her that are acceptable in other male politicians. Get over it!

    I don’t hate Clinton, and I think you’ll find if you reread what I wrote that I don’t say anything at all negative about her. I would happily have voted for her had she been the nominee this year. You can call me a sexist if you want, but I’ve offered you no evidence of that and, again, not even a negative comment about Hillary Clinton.

    The people I’m beginning to hate are the disaffected Clinton supporters who are going to vote for McCain. They’re the 13% of Democrats who left Obama for McCain in the latest ARG national poll: http://americanresearchgroup.com/. These are the people I am going to have nothing but rage toward if McCain wins, and I will certainly not then turn around and side with them four years from now. I will not reward what they plan to do this year by helping them elect their candidate in 2012.

  6. Fair enough. But I think the 13% or so who are going to vote for McCain were never really Democrats. I think they were either Independent, who liked Clinton, or just Democrats in name only. And I don’t think you’re doing yourself any favors by aligning yourself with the disenfranchised 13%. Look at the bigger picture, that over 80% of the Clinton supporters are supporting Obama.

    If Obama doesn’t win, it won’t be because of Clinton’s 13%. I think he really needs to step up his campaign strategy. Yes, he ran a great campaign against Clinton but he can’t use the same strategy against McCain. Unfortunately for him, the high road won’t get him to the White House. He needs to play to win. If this means negative ads, smear campaign, so be it. As a Democrat, I have no problem with this if it gets him elected.

    I do have a problem with Democrats punishing Clinton for the disenfranchised voters.

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